You are currently browsing the daily archive for December 12, 2010.

A confession. I do have to say from the outset that I truly adored this week’s episode. The series really came alive for me, Professor Vickery totally at home with some of her most interesting material, which she clearly relishes and she is obviously and authoritatively  in complete command of all the intricate detail.

The episode dealt with the new concept of taste, an idea imported from France, and how women’s interpretation of that sometimes dangerous conceit  influenced the interiors of homes rich and poor.

We began at Parham House in Sussex contrasting the Elizabethan, masculine Great Hall

with the 18th century feminised Drawing Room complete with harp. Mary Crawford would no doubt have approved.

The woman whose diaries provided Professor Vickery with much of her inspiration for this programme was Sophia, Lady Shelburne of Bowood House in Wiltshire and chatelaine of the most splendid town house, Shelburne House in Berkeley Square (now the Lansdowne Club)

In Professor Vickery’s words, Sophia was “a swot”, an intelligent, educated woman who became enamoured of the new fashion for neo-classicism

In search of inspiration in order to keep up with this new fashion, her diary entries show she  visited the Duke of Northumberland’s home, Syon House originally an Elizabethan building, but one that was completely overhauled by  the newly fashionable architect, Robert Adam…

to become a temple to the new taste….

incorporating detials from the evacuations at Pompei and Herculaneum in an impressive and sometimes exquisitely feminine manner.

When it came to designing their own town house/palace, the Shelburne’s commissioned Adam to design their dream home,a place suitably impressive for the politically ambitious Whig, Lord Shelburne,where he could entertain and impress supporters and government members alike.

We had a small trip to the architect, Sir John Soanes House Museum, full of its wonderful neoclassical collections(though it was not flagged up as Sir John’s house and it might have helped viewers unfamiliar with it,had it been…)

The consumerism of the 18th century one of Professor Vickery’s favourite topics-was examined. Matthew Boulton (my hero!)

and his genius for producing desirable goods for both the aristocracy and the middling classes was celebrated and we visited his home at Soho House in Birmingham.

He was shown to be a smooth operator when it came to selling and recognised that tapping into the female psyche guaranteed  profits and full order books.

Chippendale and his revolutionary Gentleman’s and Cabinetmakers Directory, the forerunner of catalogue selling was examined….

And his innovative designs for male and female pieces of furniture,thereby guaranteeing double sales, was admired.

The ingenious nature of Georgian metamorphic furniture, as in this cabinet bed at Temple Newsam near Leeds was discussed

And the trusty Ipad was used to great effect when looking at 18th century adverts for

furniture polish (again there is nothing new in this world)

And it was also used to illustrate the dangers that awaited someone overwhelmed by the new taste ,who didn’t know when to stop: incorporating neo-classicism,Gothic, Ionic Orders and Chinoiserie in their suburban villas was a sure way to ridicule.

One of my favourite chapters in Behind Closed Doors dealt with the Georgians use of wallpaper and how accurate a barometer it was for interior design and taste. We visited Kenwood House on Hampstead Heath (the home of Lord Mansfield)

to see the wonderful collection of delicate  fragments of 18th century wallpaper

including this scrap in the newly fashionable colour, yellow

and readers of Behind Closed Doors will recognise this fragment….

We saw Diana Spurlings women “doing it for themselves” on the Ipad

and visited Coles Wallpaper Manufactory where hand blocked and flocked papers are still made in the traditional manner, (a place I used to walk past on my way to catch the train to the office when I lived in London and used to peep through their open doors in the summer to see the magical process at work)

The new consumerism changed people’s social habits taking tea, for example,  where you could show off your new china and furnishings, became all the rage,a subject Professor Vickery deals with in detail in The Gentleman’s Daughter. Jane Austen knew this feeling well, especially when she was ordering her own and her brother’s Wedgwod china….

Lady Stanley, a sad case whose husband denied her decorating and visiting rights showed the other side of this Georgian coin…..poor lady,played very sensitively in this programme.

Women’s own efforts to decorate their homes was covered,and Professor Vickery visited the marvellous   Quilts exhibit at the Victoria and Albert museum which I also visited earlier this year and wrote about here

The amazing work of a ten year old, above, was lauded…..

We visited one of my favourite eccentric houses ,the home of the spinster Parminter cousins,A La Ronde and saw its totally feminine design and decoration, a miraculous survivor into the 21st century

And made a moving visit to the billet books of the Foundling hospital, which I’ve written at length about here,where in this case, a woman’s patchwork was her link to her child( and this story and a happy ending for once)

Finally, we revisited Lady Shelburne’s magically feminine Robert Adam designed drawing room which is now installed in the Richard Rogers post modern Lloyds Building in the City of London. A lasting monument to the taste of the Georgians.

There has been some adverse comment on Professors Vickery’s style in the press and on the internet over the past week,especially regarding  her raw reaction to seeing a portrait of her hero, Dr George Gibbs . This was, in fact, a very funny part of last week’s programme, for having built him up to be her ultimate “hero”  in her mind, when he was revealed to be a rather ordinary looking chap, jowly jawed and all,  Professor Vickery was rather loud in her disappointment, failing to notice what the cameraman did, that Dr Gibbs’ descendant, who was showing the portrait , bore an amazing resemblance to his great grandfather how many times removed.  *snort*  In this week’s programme we get the impression that Professor Vickery became very attached to two of her lady diarists, and in particular to Lady Shelburne. For myself, I love to witness this aspect of Professor Vickery’s presenting technique, for I think it is this honest sympathy for her sources which enables Professor Vickery to fully understand them and to bring them to life for us. She is also not “too cool for school” an attitude I embrace myself and this is I think, a refreshing change from some of our more staid presenters.

Go here to watch episode two on series link at the BBC. Next week is the last in the series. I shall be bereft.

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