Episode 25 of series 32 of the BBC’s Bargain Hunt programme included a section filmed at Number One, Royal Crescent which is a marvellous museum devoted to displaying and explaining the workings of a grand house in Bath in the Georgian era.

Tim Wannacot, the rather wonderful presenter of BBC's "Bargain Hunt" outside Number 1 The Royal Crescent, Bath

Tim Wannacot, the rather wonderful presenter of BBC’s “Bargain Hunt” outside Number 1 The Royal Crescent, Bath

The programme had a five-minute section during which we were shown some of the items on show in the study and hall of the house. First,  items that may have provided amusement -the Comforts of Bath -during the season  were displayed on a green baize-lined card table:

Card Table displaying some of the Comforts of Bath

Card Table displaying some of the Comforts of Bath

A blue transfer decorated punch bowl, sadly denuded of its alcoholic contents…

Clay pipes…

and a twist of the Virginian tobacco which would have been smoked in them.

The bureau bookcase in the same room  also had interesting items on display.

A portable, table-top celestial globe…

and two theatre tokens which were used in the theatre at Bath.

One for the cheap seats in the Gallery, above  and one for the more exclusive seats in the boxes, below.

The programme gave us a rare opportunity to examine  a sedan chair, a very popular form of transport in Bath due to the steep and narrow streets which made travelling by carriage somewhat difficult.

The chairs were made of a wooden frame, covered with leather which was then painted to provide a degrees of waterproofing …

The edges and corners were protected by decorative stud work…

The domed roof lifted up  for ease of access, and internally there were blinds for privacy, and glazed windows…

And the all-important internal upholstery, including a down filled cushion seat, to protect the traveller from the bumps and bangs of a journey from his home to the Upper Rooms, perhaps, just like Catherine Moreland in Northanger Abbey.

The programme is still  available to view via the BBC iPlayer, here, and I do urge you to look at it if you can as  this section is very informative and enjoyable.